Kathy Quill

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Kathy Quill

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4Ms. Quill, of Menasha, Wisconsin, joined the firm in 2003. Ms. Quill graduated with distinctions and phi beta kappa, from the University of Wisconsin in 1990. She received her J.D. from the University of Chicago Law School in June 1996, where she was co-president of the Women’s Law Caucus and participated in the Mandel Legal Aid Clinic, Criminal Justice Project. After law school, Ms. Quill clerked in the Federal District Court of Massachusetts for the Honorable Nathaniel M. Gorton. Ms. Quill is currently admitted to practice in Virginia, Washington, D.C., and the District of Massachusetts.

Ms. Quill has eight years of experience handling a variety of litigation matters. Most recently, Ms. Quill was an Assistant Attorney General, Senior Litigator, in the Civil Rights Division of the Attorney General’s Office in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, where she was part of the Employment Rights Project. She prosecuted cases on behalf of the public and victims of discrimination and hate crimes. These cases involved employment, disability, housing, and public accommodation discrimination, as well as violations of the Massachusetts Civil Rights Act. From 1999 to 2001, Ms. Quill worked for the United States Department of Justice as a Trial Attorney in the National Courts Section of the Civil Division. There she was responsible for the defense of a large and complicated caseload encompassing several different legal areas, including government employment law, both at the trial level in the United States Court of Federal Claims and at the appellate level in the Federal Circuit, where she argued appellate matters on a regular basis. From 1997 to 1999, Ms. Quill worked for a private Boston firm in its commercial litigation department, where she was also a member of the employment law group and participated in the representation of both employees and employers at the Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination. She also participated in many pro bono projects representing indigent individuals in cases involving employment rights, housing rights, and political asylum.

 

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